Skip to content
Menu
Alert

Due to the forecasted weather, all after school and evening activities at Linn-Mar will be canceled/postponed.

Linn-Mar  High School

Faculty Resources

Common Assessment Practices for Standards Based Learning

Linn-Mar High School will employ consistent assessment practices in all courses for which high school credit is given. Common assessments will be used for all sections of the same course. Courses within a department will be evaluated using substantially similar grading practices (as established collaboratively at the department level).

Standard practice will be adhered to in the following areas:

  • process for use of priority and supporting standards
  • use of artifacts as evidence of learning
  • multiple measures of priority standards
  • remediation, revision, and relearning
  • use of INC and zero prohibition of extra credit deadlines and extensions

Use of Priority and Supporting Standards

LMHS courses are defined by priority standards stating the major performance expectations of the course. Supporting standards combine to define priority standards. A single priority standard may stand alone or be defined by two or more supporting standards.

A student’s course grade will be determined by averaging (or weighted averaging) of priority standards. Priority standard scale scores may be determined by using the most recent, calculating the median or mode, averaging supporting standards, or using an alternate method established or approved at the department level. The method of calculation must be communicated to students before assessment. In general, the most recent measure(s) of student performance should be weighted more heavily.

Supporting standards may also be used to determine priority standard scale scores using any of the above methods. Use of supporting standards must be communicated to students in advance of assessment.

Artifacts as Evidence of Student Learning

Student learning will be measured by evaluating learning artifacts. Artifacts may include tests, quizzes, projects, oral examinations, writing samples, or any other exercise that can demonstrate student knowledge or skill. Artifacts do not receive a score as they would in a traditional system. Artifacts are used as evidence of student performance on priority standards. Students receive standard scores that reflect their performance.

Multiple Measures

All priority standards will be measured a minimum of 2 times. Subsequent measures need not be identical in form to an initial assessment. All summative measures must be the same for all sections of a course in form and substance.

Remediation, Revision, and Relearning

If a student is at or below a 1 on any Priority Standard (or Supporting Standard at the teacher’s discretion), the following Tier 1 support is expected of teachers:

Tier 1 Support – Teacher/Classroom/PLC-Level Intervention:

    1. Communication with student and Learning Center.
    2. Classroom Interventions directly focused on the Priority Standard.
    3. Parent-Guardian Contact.
    4. Study Table and/or Early Session Requests.

Students needing more than Tier 1 support will be advanced to additional Tier 2 or Tier 3 support:

Tier 2 Support – Tutoring Center, Guided Studies placement during scheduled Learning Center time. (Grades 11-12 students will be placed in designated Learning Center area or in the Academic Assistance Center Office during any unscheduled time until above a 1 on the Priority (or Supporting) Standard.

Tier 3 Support – Achievement Studies placement during scheduled Learning Center time. (Grades 11-12 students will be placed in designated Learning Center area or in the Academic Assistance Center Office during any unscheduled time until above a 1 on the Priority (or Supporting) Standard.

An opportunity for students to remediate and/or revise a priority standard score will be provided for all priority standards. Students will be expected to demonstrate attention to remedial learning before remediation is provided such as: original and/or additional practice, committed use of early session, remediation artifacts, etc.

It is the student’s responsibility to produce and complete a remediation plan and assessment no later than ten school days after scoring of and feedback on the initial assessment has been provided in consultation with and approval by the teacher. After ten days, students failing to successfully remediate a Priority Standard to level 1 or higher will be assigned Study Table and a Tier 2 intervention (Tutoring Center or Guided Studies) or Tier 3 intervention (Achievement Studies) until successful.

Use of INC

INC (Incomplete) will be entered in the gradebook where a student has not yet had opportunity to submit work for assessment. INC grades are most appropriate where a student has been absent or granted an extension to complete assigned work due to medical, 504, or IEP considerations. An INC grade is also appropriate for submission of work not yet meeting level 1 criteria. An INC grade on any single priority standard will result in an overall course grade of INC until resolved.

Use of NC

NC (No Credit) will be entered in the gradebook to demonstrate failure without reasonable cause to submit work by the expected deadline. An unresolved NC grade on any single priority standard will result in an overall course grade of INC, effectively denying the student course credit. An NC grade may be converted to full academic credit until the end of the grading term. Assignment of an NC grade or grades at any point in a term may affect measures of proficiency related to employability skills.

Use of Zero

A zero does not have a conversion value in the LMHS assessment system. NC or INC are used to communicate that work was either not submitted or submitted below standard.

Extra Credit

Extra credit (credit awarded outside of standards measures to boost a student’s grade) is not allowed.

Due Dates and Extensions

Students are expected to meet communicated due dates for work submission. Students who do not meet due dates are to have work recorded as NC in the gradebook until work has been submitted. For those courses that include employability standards in student grades, failure to meet a due date can affect a student’s appraised proficiency on one or more employability standards.

Employability Skills

Employability skills https://iowacore.gov/iowa-core/subject/21st-century-skills/9/employability-skills are 21st Century skills defined by the Iowa Core. These skills comprise the abilities and learning dispositions that have been identified as being required for success in 21st Century society.

Employability skills include:

21.9–12.ES.1 Communicate and work productively with others, incorporating different perspectives and cross-cultural understanding, to increase innovation and the quality of work.

  • Work appropriately and productively with others
  • Use different perspectives to increase innovation and the quality of work
  • Use all the appropriate principles of communication effectively

21.9–12.ES.2 Adapt to various roles and responsibilities and work flexibly in climates of ambiguity and changing priorities.

  • Adapt to varied roles, responsibilities, and expectations
  • Work effectively in a climate of ambiguity and changing priorities
  • Demonstrate appropriate risk–taking

21.9–12.ES.3 Demonstrate leadership skills, integrity, ethical behavior, and social responsibility while collaborating to achieve common goals

  • Use interpersonal skills to influence and guide others toward a goal
  • Leverage the strengths of others to accomplish a common goal
  • Demonstrate integrity and ethical behavior
  • Demonstrate mental, physical, and emotional preparedness to accomplish the task

21.9–12.ES.4 Demonstrate initiative and self–direction through high achievement and lifelong learning while exploring the ways individual talents and skills can be used for productive outcomes in personal and professional life.

  • Perform work without oversight
  • Use time efficiently to manage workload
  • Assess one’s own mastery of skills
  • Set and achieve high standards and goals
  • Engage in effective problem-solving process

21.9–12.ES.5 Demonstrate productivity and accountability by meeting high expectations.

  • Deliver quality job performance on time
  • Demonstrate accountability for individual performance

Employability skills defined by the Iowa Core may be calculated into a student’s overall course grade at a weight of up to 10%. All sections of the same course will use the same employability skills and weighting. Students and parents will have access to employability skill performance through PowerSchool. Teachers may teach, measure, and report on individual student performance on one or more employability skill(s) as appropriate.

Final Assessments

A final assessment (i.e. end-of-term exam) is to be given to students in all courses. A final assessment is not required to be a written exam, but must be delivered to measure comprehensive or targeted prior learning at the end of a course. An assessment of improvement or student retention of course skills and knowledge will be measured relative to communicated priority standards. Standards scale scores determined through assessment of individual test performance may then be used to influence term priority standards scale scores and overall course grades. Final assessments, both targeted and comprehensive, are final summative opportunities for students to demonstrate learning. Reassessment of finals will not be provided.

Required Evidence of Learning

To adequately assess student proficiency on course priority standards, many summative assessments will be designated as Required Evidence of Learning (REL). The designation of REL will be made at the department level for each individual course. Failure to reach a Level 1 proficiency on an REL artifact for a priority standard will require remediation, relearning, reassessment, and demonstrated Level 1 (or higher) proficiency to earn course credit.

Reassessment policies for three common REL situations are outlined below.

Student scores Level 1 or higher on Required Evidence of Learning (REL).

    1. Teacher enters assigned scale score in the gradebook.
    2. If the REL was and will continue to be the only opportunity for a student to provide evidence of learning on the target standard –
      1. the teacher will provide a minimum of one opportunity to reassess on the standard within 5 days (quarter grading term) or 10 days (semester grading term) of the original assessment.
      2. the student must demonstrate attention to and effort toward relearning to earn the opportunity to reassess.
    3. If the REL was not the only opportunity for a student to provide evidence of learning on the target standard –
      1. the teacher may provide opportunity for artifact reassessment at his or her discretion within 5 days (quarter grading term) or 10 days (semester grading term) of the original assessment.
      2. the student must demonstrate attention to and effort toward relearning to earn the opportunity to reassess.

Student fails to submit Required Evidence of Learning (REL) on time. Student does not have good cause (sufficient opportunity given, work not submitted).

    1. Teacher enters NC (No Credit) in the gradebook.
    2. Teacher may administer behavioral consequence (detention, loss of time release, early session required, etc.) where appropriate.
    3. Student may assess on the standard until the end of the term.
      1. If the student does not submit an early-term REL by the end of the term, the student does not exhibit acceptable competence on the required priority standard and fails the course.
      2. If the REL was due within ten days of the end of the term, the student is given additional time (not to exceed two weeks) to complete the REL.
      3. If the REL is not submitted by the end of the extension period, the student does not exhibit acceptable competence on the required priority standard and fails the course.
      4. If the student submits the REL within the described time constraints, the REL is evaluated and the assigned scale score is used as evidence of learning in the determination of the course grade.

Student does not submit Required Evidence of Learning (REL) on time for good cause (absence, extended time granted, etc.) or fails to achieve a minimum level of proficiency.

    1. Teacher enters INC (Incomplete) in the gradebook.
    2. Student may assess on the standard until the end of the term.
      1. If the student does not submit an early-term REL by the end of the term, the student does not exhibit acceptable competence on the required priority standard and fails the course.
      1. If the REL was due within ten days of the end of the term, the student is given additional time (not to exceed two weeks) to complete the REL.
        1. If the REL is not submitted by the end of the extension period, the student does not exhibit acceptable competence on the required priority standard and fails the course.
      1. If the student submits the REL within the described time constraints, the REL is evaluated and the assigned scale score is used as evidence of learning in the determination of the course grade.